Places to stay in Shelburne, Nova Scotia

We currently have 23 accommodations in and around Shelburne with other regional listings available for Hotels, Inns, Campgrounds, Motor Inns and other properties.

B&Bs - 6 Motels - 4 Camping / RV - 4 Cottages / Lodges / Rentals - 9

Located 2.5 hours from Halifax airport, 1 hour and 15 minutes from Yarmouth airport and ferries, and 2 and a half hours from Digby Ferry to N.B., Shelburne is not far away from anywhere. We have excellent paved highways to travel our famous Lighthouse Route. Local restaurants include Scotia Lunch, A1 Piero Pizza, Charlotte Lane, and Lothar's.

Wondering where to stay? The region is mainly known for Cottage or Rental style accommodations, though there are a few nearby Bed and Breakfasts. If you are travelling in the area, Shelburne is located close to Blacks Brook, Campbells Lake, Gunning Cove, Gunning Cove and Middle Ledge.

Hungry from travelling? Try checking here for food options for Shelburne.

Selected properties

MacKenzie's Cottages, Motel & Suites

Motel located 11km from the center of Shelburne.

MacKenzie's has been family-owned for decades and we offer the best of Nova Scotia intimate cottages, affordable motel and luxury suites in a park-like, brook side setting in a great location in the centre of town.

Photograph of MacKenzie's Cottages, Motel & Suites, Shelburne
260 Upper Water Street
Shelburne, Nova Scotia


The Island's Provincial Park

Campsite located 1km from the center of Shelburne.

There are shower and toilet facilities on site. In addition to the campsites there is a beautiful picnic area, with huts to have lunch in, set on the water..

Photograph of The Island's Provincial Park, Shelburne
C/O Department of Natural Resources, P.O. Box 369
Shelburne, Nova Scotia

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More about the areas accommodations and tourism

The scenery in Shelburne is breathtaking. Miles of forests surrounding crystal lakes and crashing ocean. The air is fresh and clear. The charm of the Loyalist days is still felt in our county but amongst the history, is everything one might need for modern living.

Southwestern Nova Scotia is one of the most cost effective places in North America to locate a business. The tax rate is very favourable, there is a large work force available, and the support businesses needed are plentiful. Many business people have relocated to Shelburne and run their businesses through the internet and teleconferencing.

Other local Shelburne information and places to visit.

  • Longitude: -65°19'0.1199
  • Latitude: 43°45'46.08

Birchtown Museum - 131 Birchtown Road RR#3, Exit 27, off Highway 103, Box 1194

The Black Loyalist Heritage Museum features exhibits that pertain to the history and lives of Black Loyalists and their descendants. Included are archaeological artifacts, archival records & photos, as well as family genealogies. A scaled version of "Remembering Black Loyalists, Black Communities" is a part of our permanent display along with a depiction of the Black Pioneer Regiment. Operated by: The Black Loyalist Heritage Society Open May 18-September 3, daily 11:00 am-5:00 pm. Admission, individual $2.00, family $5.00, donations welcome

Capitol Theatre - 32 John Street

Independently owned and operated, the Capitol Theatre, originally called the Magnet Theatre opened it's doors on October 27, 1916. Built in 1916 by John Etherington (boat shop owner) and Frank S. King (boat carpenter), the theatre has been in operation ever since. From the days of the silent movies to today it has been creating illusions through film. Come and experience the past, the present and the future; the real, the not so real and the fantastic with us.

Dory Shop Museum - 11 Dock

The dory was essential for the famous Grand Banks fishery. This dory shop, built by John Williams in 1880, was one of seven booming businesses in Shelburne that built thousands of dories every year for American and Canadian fishing schooners. In the middle of the last century, two innovative ideas revolutionized the Grand Banks fishery. Until then, the banks were so rich that men fished with baited hooks and handlines off the decks of schooners, catching as many fish as they needed. Someone figured out that, rather than fishing with a single baited hook, it would be more effective to hang lots of hooks off a long line strung along the ocean floor, just where hungry cod and haddock loved to feed. The idea worked, and trawl fishing was born. Next, someone calculated that more fish could be caught if you could spread your fishermen out over more ocean. How to do this? What about piling a bunch of little boats onto a schooner, carrying them out to the banks, and letting fishermen fish from them? Another good idea! Dory fishing was born. Sidney Mahaney puts the finishing touches on a Shelburne dory. Mahaney began working in the Dory Shop at age 17 and continued to build dories here, on and off, until he died a few years ago, age 95. When trawl fishing and dory fishing got together, a fishing technology was created that dominated the banks fishery until the 1940s. Dories were perfect for this role. Flat bottomed with flared sides, they could be easily nested and lashed in place on the decks of schooners. Dories were also cheap to build. In their production, Shelburne excelled. Until the mid-1880s, dories were built using naturally curved wood, or "grown knees," as frames. These knees had to be sawn from crooked wood such as tree roots. They were difficult and dangerous to produce.

Nearby towns

Shelburne is close to:

Churchover - 4km

Lockeport - 12km

Middle Ohio - 13km

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